Tips For Buying Word Art Online

First, a word about my own credentials. Apart from a level in art, and being an artist in my own right, I have been amassing artwork since 1974. I’ve got over three years of expertise. From the early years, I’d go to galleries and auction houses. Some were held on cruise ships. However, I did not have the luxury of utilizing online tools before the Internet came into common use in the nineties. Today, areas like EBay have been the dominant form of linking the purchaser with the seller on a worldwide scale. For the newcomer, this can look to be a blessing because of all of the choices and alternatives available. However there are so many barriers and pitfalls as opportunities.

Assuming that you’re buying word art prints out of small variations with hand-signed signatures of this artist. That would be accurate for the vast majority of collectors and artwork that changes hands on. These kinds of prints are a lot more common and affordable. Few of us can afford an original Picasso etching or possibly a Leroy Neiman painting. Therefore, prints also have been the medium of choice. But prints, that may be lithographs, etchings, serigraphs, or giclees also have spawned a new generation of frauds and fakes. Virtually anyone can utilize modern scanners to recreate a print on photo-quality paper and draw a touch which claims to be a first.

The next part of the deceit comes in the COA or “certificate of authenticity” which generally accompanies those prints. The document verifies the artwork, artist, edition number, moderate, and other descriptors about where the print came out. The problem is just like the forged signature. Everyone can state that a print is real and design a COA on a pc word or drawing program that appears quite official. They could use words like “documented, official, certified, confirmed, and authenticated,” they all need. But this does not prove something.